Bridge

A bridge is a dental appliance that replaces one or more natural missing teeth, thereby "bridging" the space between two teeth. Fixed bridges are cemented into place next to the "abutment" teeth - the surrounding teeth on either side of the space. Unlike removable partial dentures, fixed bridges cannot be taken out of the mouth by the patient. A fixed bridge is a device that typically consists of three units- a pontic (a false tooth) fused between two crowns that are cemented into the abutment teeth.

If you are missing any teeth and are committed to maintain good oral hygiene practice, you may be a good candidate for a bridge. A bridge is the most natural choice to fill the space in you mouth left by missing teeth. If left unfilled, this space can cause the surrounding teeth to drift out of position and can cause teeth and gums to become more susceptible to tooth decay and gum disease that can cause further tooth loss. Fixed bridges not only correct an altered bite, improve you chewing ability and speech, but they also safeguard you appearance by preventing the collapse of you facial texture that can cause premature wrinkles and age lines.
What types of bridges are there?

Beside traditional bridges, another popular design is the resin bonded or "Maryland" bridge, primarily used for the front teeth. This is usually the most economical choice when the abutment teeth are healthy and don't contain large fillings. The pontic is fused to metal bands that can be bonded to the abutment teeth with resin cement and hidden from view, reducing the amount of preparation on the adjacent teeth.

A cantilever bridge may be used if there are teeth on only one side of the span. This involves anchoring the pontic on one side over one or more natural, adjacent teeth.